Democrats Are Trembling After GOP Frontrunner Defies All Expectations

Former President Donald Trump is undoubtedly the most popular Republican candidate perhaps in U.S. history. However, due to his bravery in standing up against Dr. Fauci and the other COVID tyrants, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is closely on Trump’s heels.

Most Republicans in Florida support the idea of Gov. Ron DeSantis running to be the party’s nominee for president in 2024, according to a new poll.

Although most voters in the state said that they would not want DeSantis to run for the White House, the majority of Republicans support the idea of him seeking the GOP nomination in 2024. Voters are divided over whether he should seek reelection as governor, with 48% saying he deserves another term and 45% saying he does not.

  • 59% of Florida voters said they don’t want DeSantis to run for president in 2024.
  • 35% of Florida voters want DeSantis to run for president.
  • 24% of Republicans don’t want DeSantis to run for president.
  • 67% of Republicans want DeSantis to run for president.
  • 96% of Democrats don’t want DeSantis to run for president.
  • 2% of Democrats want DeSantis to run for president.
  • 61% of independents don’t want DeSantis to run for president.
  • 35% of independents want DeSantis to run for president.

Most voters were positive about the current state of Florida, with 57% saying they are satisfied with the way things are going in the state, compared with 41% who are dissatisfied. Voters were divided on DeSantis’ job performance, with 47% approving — an increase from June of last year — and 45% disapproving.

Joe Biden received a negative approval rating in the state, 40% approving to 53% disapproving, while Florida voters were split on the state’s U.S. senators, who are both Republicans. Rick Scott received a mixed rating, with 42% approving and 40% disapproving; Marco Rubio received a more positive rating, with 49% approving and 38% disapproving.

Quinnipiac surveyed 889 registered voters in Florida from August 17-21, with a margin of error of plus or minus 3.3 percentage points.

Author: Asa McCue